3. You Can’t Change Your National Heritage

October 12, 2016 , In: 10 Things You Can't Change, Faith, Josie, Write 31 Days , With: No Comments
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10 Things You Can’t Change About Yourself

3. Your National Heritage

Tim Tebow, a former professional football player, now of New York Met’s baseball fame was born in Makati. His parents were and are missionaries from the United States of America and were in the Phillipines when he was born. Tebow’s nationality is Makati, Phillipine. His citizenship is the United States. The first breath of air Tebow experienced was that of the heart of metro Manila.

DifferenceBetween.net says the following about nationality and citizenship:
“Some nations confer honorary citizenship to individuals. But no country can confer honorary nationality on any one as his birthplace cannot be changed. Each of have a certain place in which we were born.”

One’s place of birth matters especially if a person chooses to stay in that particular culture. Depending on where a person is born and lives depends on their cultural bias, thoughts, ideas, rules, regulations and practices.

For example laws of governance make a huge difference in some countries.

In 2013, NPR did a story on places where women cannot drive. “Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world that effectively prohibits women from driving, a ban supported by conservative clerics. While there is no law formally banning female drivers, the government does not give them licenses.”

The author of the article wrote : “In 1990, 47 women made the first attempt to challenge the ban. They all lost their jobs, were prohibited from traveling for years, and were shunned for their defiance.”

In Some countries, most common in the Arab countries of the Persian Gulf such as Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, and the UAE woman are required to wear a niqab; a veil  for the face that leaves the area around the eyes clear.   To many in free areas such as the United Kingdom, Switzerland, The United States and other countries exposing freedom, this would be a hindrance so nationality definitely plays a huge part in one’s actions, behaviors and rights.

Another important policy known in the world is that of Chinese regulation. Wikipedia has noted a“ one-child mandate, a part of the family planning policy in China. “It was introduced between 1978 and 1980 and began to be formally phased out in 2015. The policy allowed many exceptions and ethnic minorities were exempt. In 2007, 36% of China’s population was subject to a strict one-child restriction, with an additional 53% being allowed to have a second child if the first child was a girl. Provincial governments imposed fines for violations, and the local and national governments created commissions to raise awareness and carry out registration and inspection work.” Being born in China and subject to the feelings of birth related concerns would certainly weigh heavily on one’s mind; especially if that person was a girl and certainly if that child was a 2nd or 3rd born baby.

Being born in America, the most powerful country of the free world would be one of the great graces as of the grand freedom afforded those who live in this land. In America, the opportunities of advancement are so great. People from across the world wish to come to America and many risk their lives to come. Tom Wass, of The Saginaw News Staff wrote : “…People risk their lives every day to enter illegally, fleeing those countries we are attempting to aspire to.
They flee their countries with nationalized health care and free college tuition to come to the United States where it is not free. They flee their country to come here because they have no voice in the manner in which they have been governed. They come to the United States to acquire what a socialistic government cannot give them.”

God chose you to be born of a certain nationality for a reason known unto to Him. Our purpose is to live daily to find out His plan for us. To find out His plan, we must read God’s Word, the Bible, daily and live out His Word in our lives.

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